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Our Work

Community Outreach, Conservation Management, and Anti-poaching

ACCF is focused on helping human life, wildlife, and critical habitats thrive in and around the African wilderness areas we protect. We partner with the communities that live next to these protected areas in Mozambique, Tanzania, Rwanda, and Zimbabwe, in order to achieve effective and sustainable results. Three key areas of focus for our work include community outreach, conservation management, and anti-poaching. We are the peacekeepers on the frontlines of the human-wildlife conflict.

Community Kids

Community Outreach

The communities surrounding protected wildlife areas in Africa are key stakeholders in conservation. The work that we support aims to help communities to thrive both socially and economically while living in peace with the surrounding wilderness areas.

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Anti Poaching Karingani - Horseback

Anti-Poaching

Wildlife is under constant threat of poaching for commercial bushmeat, habitat encroachment, charcoal extraction, and the illegal trade of wildlife contraband such as ivory and rhino horn. To combat these ecosystem threats we support anti-poaching efforts that combine cutting-edge technology with boots, paws, and hooves on the ground.

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Grumeti Land -- photo credits: Karin Schermbrucker

Conservation

Conservation management encompasses an array of activities, from treating wounded wildlife to managing fires and removing invasive alien plants in order to allow the landscape and its flora and fauna to flourish. ACCF supports projects ranging from managing wildfires and reducing the impact of invasive alien plants to the reintroduction of locally extinct animal species.

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View All Our Work by Program

Grumeti Fund

Alien Plant Management in Tanzania

Grumeti Fund
Grumeti Fund
African Wildlife Conservation
Alien plant species are harmful to indigenous ecosystems, both plants and animals. Comprehensive invasive alien plant management programs are in place in the concessions and in selected neighboring villages to target and eradicate exotic species and prevent reseeding.

Canine Unit in Tanzania

Grumeti Fund
Grumeti Fund
Anti Poaching
The Grumeti Fund Canine Unit is a dedicated detection and tracking dog unit committed to our ongoing quest to stay one step ahead of poachers. The permanent presence of our rescue dogs – DJ, Radar, Oke, and Tony – and their skilled handlers enhance the Anti-Poaching Department’s ability to apprehend poachers.

Community Upliftment in Tanzania

Grumeti Fund
Grumeti Fund
Community Outreach
UPLIFT (Unlocking Prosperous Livelihoods for Tomorrow), developed by the Grumeti Fund (GF), is a program focused on community upliftment in Africa.

Enterprise Development in Tanzania

Grumeti Fund
Grumeti Fund
Community Outreach
Alternative options for income and business development in Africa need to be realized so that households that rely on poaching revenue can break free from their dependence on these illegal activities. ACCF supports Grumeti Fund’s partnership with Raizcorp – an entrepreneurial development incubator with a proven track record of success in business development in Africa.

Environmental Education Center in Tanzania

Grumeti Fund
Grumeti Fund
Community Outreach
Successful and sustainable wildlife preservation is only possible when quality environmental and wildlife conservation education is in place. ACCF supports Grumeti Fund’s focus on environmental education and the critical role each individual plays in minimizing his or her impact on the earth’s limited resources.

Fire Management Program in Tanzania

Grumeti Fund
Grumeti Fund
African Wildlife Conservation
Fire is an important part of the Serengeti ecosystem. It is a naturally occurring phenomenon that improves nutrient cycling in the soil, leading to more nutritious forage for wildlife. In the Grumeti concessions, fire is used as a tool to manage the health of the ecosystem.

Game Scouts in Tanzania

Grumeti Fund
Grumeti Fund
Anti Poaching
The Grumeti Fund employs a team of 100 anti-poaching game scouts tasked with the important job of protecting African wildlife. Stationed across the 350,000-acre reserve – at camps or in Observation Posts, as a free-ranging Mobile Patrol Unit or as part of the Special Operations Group – these scouts are responsible for protecting the African wildlife and flora that has rebounded over the past 15 years in this critical area of the western Serengeti.

Innovative Technology in Tanzania

Grumeti Fund
Grumeti Fund
Anti Poaching
The Grumeti Fund anti-poaching and law enforcement department makes use of several types of innovative anti-poaching technology to proactively prevent poaching events. Using innovative technology gives the anti-poaching game scouts an edge when patrolling the region.

Joint Intelligence Unit in Tanzania

Grumeti Fund
Grumeti Fund
Anti Poaching
Anti-poaching efforts for the Grumeti Fund have been escalated by the establishment of an anti-poaching Joint Intelligence Unit - a collaboration between the Grumeti Fund Law Enforcement Department and the Tanzanian Wildlife Management Authority (TAWA).

Special Operations Group in Tanzania

Grumeti Fund
Grumeti Fund
Anti Poaching
Of the 100 strong force of anti-poaching game scouts, 18 individuals have been identified to join an elite special operations anti-poaching unit. These game scouts have proven themselves to be the best of the best: men with absolute integrity and the highest work ethic.

Wildlife Reintroduction Program in Tanzania

Grumeti Fund
Grumeti Fund
African Wildlife Conservation
The Grumeti Fund is committed to developing programs that support the translocation and reintroduction of a number of endangered and locally extinct wildlife species – both to Grumeti and to the wider Serengeti ecosystem.

Wildlife Wellbeing Program in Tanzania

Grumeti Fund
Grumeti Fund
African Wildlife Conservation
Poaching in the Serengeti region is predominantly made up of hunting for bushmeat. The hunting tactics adopted by poachers focus specifically on snares set up throughout the reserve in the hopes of capturing passing wildlife. While the anti-poaching scouts work tirelessly to patrol for snares and remove them safely, animals that come into contact with these snares incur detrimental injuries.

Women and Girls Empowerment in Tanzania

Grumeti Fund
Grumeti Fund
Community Outreach
We support Women and Girls Empowerment programs and events that aim to correct the imbalance caused by the many barriers put in the way of girls realizing their full potential. Our Community Outreach Program focuses on three main areas: Environmental Awareness, Enterprise Development, and Education, and across all of these programs is Women and Girls Empowerment. 

Youth Education in Tanzania

Grumeti Fund
Grumeti Fund
Community Outreach
The ACCF supports African youth education initiatives run by the Grumeti Fund (GF) in Tanzania. These initiatives focus on providing educational scholarships and mentorship programs to local youth. Specific vocational studies within conservation and tourism sectors are key, and students are further supported by being paired with mentors from GF to develop the life skills required for employment in the sector.

Karingani

Game Reserve Elephant Collaring Project in Mozambique

Karingani
Karingani
African Wildlife Conservation
Satellite tracking collars allow for critical information on elephant movement, migration, and habitat use to be collected. This enables researchers and reserve management to gain knowledge into how elephants utilize the landscape and provide insight into how they can better preserve the ecosystem around its largest inhabitants’ use.

The Wild Dog Range Expansion Project in Mozambique

Karingani
Karingani
African Wildlife Conservation
African wild dogs have disappeared from much of their former range, threatened by shrinking habitat, persecution, disease, and human activity. While these premier hunters used to roam much of the African continent in numbers of 500,000 or more, the species has suffered a decline in most regions, with shrinking numbers now mostly confined to Southern Africa.

Rwanda Project

Akarabo Nursery & Garden in Rwanda

Rwanda Project
Rwanda Project
African Wildlife Conservation
Since 2017, the Rwanda Project - Volcanoes National Park has collaborated with neighboring communities to restore the former pasture around Volcanoes National Park to create a critical buffer zone between agricultural lands and the Park.

Ansellia Africana (the Leopard Orchid) in Rwanda

Rwanda Project
Rwanda Project
African Wildlife Conservation
The genus Ansellia was described by John Lindley and named in honor of the English assistant botanist, John Ansell, who discovered a specimen of Ansellia Africana in 1841 on a trip to the former Fernando Po Island off the coast of West Africa.

Biodiversity Monitoring in Rwanda

Rwanda Project
Rwanda Project
African Wildlife Conservation
Camera traps Installed in agreement with Volcanoes National Park, these monitor wildlife entering the property and determine how and when they make use of the additional wildlife refugia area.

The Orchid Project in Rwanda

Rwanda Project
Rwanda Project
African Wildlife Conservation
With the establishment of a comprehensive collection of indigenous orchids from the region, this unique initiative – a collaboration with Michael Tibbs (an internationally renowned orchid specialist), the Rwandan Development Board, Volcanoes National Park, and the University of Kigali’s Musanze Campus – is set to leave a lasting legacy.

The Malilangwe Trust

Cadet Ranger Program in Zimbabwe

The Malilangwe Trust
The Malilangwe Trust
Community Outreach
The Cadet Ranger Program is a Malilangwe community initiative, which is an augmentation of the Malilangwe Scouts. The inaugural course was initiated on 10 December 2018 with 22 young men (aged 16 to 19 years) recruited from the neighboring Dhumisani Secondary School.

Conservation Education Program in Zimbabwe

The Malilangwe Trust
The Malilangwe Trust
Community Outreach
Malilangwe’s Conservation Education Program started in 2012, is designed, instructed, and funded by The Malilangwe Trust.  The course is aimed at Grade 6 students (ages 11 to 15) from eleven Government Schools in neighbouring communities, to instill an appreciation for wildlife, conservation, global sustainability, environmental processes, cultural heritage and equip the youngsters with a range of life skills. 

Cultural Heritage in Zimbabwe

The Malilangwe Trust
The Malilangwe Trust
African Wildlife Conservation
Zimbabwe is home to 15,000 rock art and engraving sites, of which many are unique to the country with few examples found in the rest of Southern Africa. Although carbon dating has not been performed on the rock art found on the Malilangwe Reserve it is known that sandstone rock art has a lifespan of approximately 6,000 years.

E-Learning Center in Zimbabwe

The Malilangwe Trust
The Malilangwe Trust
Community Outreach
Mwenje Primary School’s E-Learning Center is an eco-friendly classroom, powered by solar energy and fitted with tanks to store harvested rainwater. The main purpose of the center is for the use of electronic technologies for students to access an educational curriculum, based on the Zimbabwe Government School syllabus.

Girl Child Empowerment Trust (GCET) in Zimbabwe

The Malilangwe Trust
The Malilangwe Trust
Community Outreach
Girl Child Empowerment Trust is borne of Morenlet Muravu (teacher, social worker, motivational speaker) with a vision to GCET being a dynamic and reputable leader in the greater understanding of and active participation on behalf of girls and young women in girl child issues.

Health & Wellness at Malilangwe

The Malilangwe Trust
The Malilangwe Trust
Community Outreach
Malilangwe is home to all its staff and their immediate families, who reside in three different villages on the property. As such, an environment that nurtures happiness and good health has been created.

Khomonani Women’s Garden in Zimbabwe

The Malilangwe Trust
The Malilangwe Trust
Community Outreach
Khomonani Irrigation Scheme was set up by Malilangwe in 2008 (in line with United Nations Development Programme) to provide funding and support of a market garden, which is managed by a group of 21 women. The garden has a borehole, pump, and generator system, as well as a 30,000-liter water storage tank, gravity-fed canals, and storage sheds.

Malilangwe Research

The Malilangwe Trust
The Malilangwe Trust
African Wildlife Conservation
The Conservation team is responsible for restoring and preserving the historic biodiversity of the Reserve. Malilangwe approaches conservation through science-based management, leading to one of the world’s most successful reintroductions of the critically endangered black rhinoceros.

Malilangwe Scouts in Zimbabwe

The Malilangwe Trust
The Malilangwe Trust
Anti Poaching
Malilangwe re-introduced rhinos between 1996 and 1998. Pre 2008, poaching was limited to snaring for meat and netting of fish. From 2007, Southern Africa experienced a sharp increase in rhino poaching. At this time, the Reserve was only partially fenced and, although the scout force was well-organized, it had fewer personnel and was less militarized.

Malilangwe’s Nutrition Program

The Malilangwe Trust
The Malilangwe Trust
Community Outreach
Malilangwe’s Child Supplementary Feeding Program shifted operations with a transition from corn-soya porridge, which had previously been distributed to 400 sites, replacing it with mahewu (a highly nutritious drink) which is currently distributed to 32 schools and 4 orphanages. 

Rhino Conservation in Zimbabwe

The Malilangwe Trust
The Malilangwe Trust
African Wildlife Conservation
Rhino conservation is at the helm of Malilangwe’s journey to re-establishing the natural state of the Reserve. The Malilangwe Trust is responsible for one of the world’s most successful, critically endangered black rhino programs (re-introduction population growing by 532% in 21 years for black rhino and 729% for white rhino)

Sustainability at Malilangwe

The Malilangwe Trust
The Malilangwe Trust
Community Outreach
The Sustainability department aims to mitigate environmental problems that stem from the communities that live on and around the Malilangwe Wildlife Reserve. There are three key areas of focus; waste management, energy use, and water use.

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